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Lens On The City

In an attempt to develop my photography chops a little, I enrolled in the "Lens On The City" program sponsored by the Detroit Opera House this week. I could still benefit from more "how-to" technical tutoring, but it was a great opportunity to explore, with a guide and group, some corners of the city that even a long-time resident like me might not get to see very often: backstage at the Opera Theater, the roof of the  Park Shelton, the the Mies Van Der Rohe-designed Lafayette Park developments, the conference center and reflecting pool at Wayne State designed by Minoru Yamasaki, and more. Here's some of my faves from the two days of shooting we did.


Tony Smith's "Gracehoper" from the Park Shelton roof.






The still-new-ish Hellenic Museum is a work in progress but full of interesting stuff (at least to someone who married into a Greek family. There's a photo of my in-laws there). 




From the dolls-of-the-world collection at the International Institute.




Lafayette Park. Maybe the second photo can stand for the double-edged nature of the project - a beautiful and unique (if only semi-realized) mid-century modern planned community, but built on the bulldozed spot where the vibrant (and dilapidated) black neighborhood/jazz hotspot Black Bottom once stood.



Costuming room at the Opera House.






The Yamasaki reflecting pool near the conference center and art building at Wayne State University, recently renovated. It sat dry and neglected the whole time I attended the school in the late '80s-early '90s.

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